fantomx11

Lego d6

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I cross-posted this from RPG.net

 

I have been working on a RPG that can be played with younger kids and using LEGO. I thought I'd post the rules here and get some critiques. This is based on a stripped down Minisix/D6 Legend with a smattering of FirstFable thrown in.

 

Dice Basics

This game uses regular six sided dice. Dice pools are written as a number followed by a “D” (i.e. “1D”, “4D”). The number is how many dice to roll. For instance “2D” means roll two dice. When rolling a dice pool, any die that results in 3, 4, 5, or 6 means you get to take a brick.

 

One die rolled is always the wild die. Use a different color die to represent this or roll the dice one at a time making the last die rolled the Nexo die. On the first roll of the wild die, a result of 1 means you lose a brick, a result 3, 4, and 5 mean you get a brick, and a result of 6 means you get a brick and a get to roll the wild die again. On subsequent rolls of the wild die, a result of 1 does not mean you lose a brick.

 

How to Make a Character

1: Distribute 12 dice between the four attributes. No attribute may have less than one nor more than four dice assigned to it.

2: Choose your likes and dislikes

3: Choose 3 skills.

4: Choose 1 complication.

5: Select a special thing.

6: Set your brick rating.

 

Attributes

Each character has four attributes which measure basic physical and mental abilities that are common to every creature. Characters distribute 12D among the four attributes. These are rated on a scale of 1D to 4D.

 

Strong: represents physical strength, toughness, and amount of damage dealt when striking unarmed.

Fast represents aim and coordination.

Smart: represents mental creativity and intelligence.

Charm: represents charisma, resolve, and leadership.

 

Likes and Dislikes

You should chose at least three things your knight likes and three things your knight dislikes. These can help you know how your knight would react to different situations that might happen while playing the game. There is no limit to the number of likes and dislikes you can add.

 

Skills

You may choose up to three things that your character is good at. Anything that you can do could be a skill. Anytime your skill would help in the current situation, you get to roll an extra die. Sometimes multiple skills would help. In those cases, add an extra die for each skill that would help. You can add more skills, but every skill you add means you must add another complication.

 

Complications

Complications are things that your character is not so good at. Like skills, they should be something that are likely to be used in the game. “Doesn't like to eat spinach” is not a good complication. “Is afraid of roller coasters” might have some uses, but “Trips over her own feet” would be really good. Anytime your complication would hinder you in the current situation, you must remove a die from the die pool. Anytime a complication takes a die away from a pool, you get to add the die to your bonus pool.

 

Special Thing

Special things are something that is unique to your knight. It might be a magic weapon or a special fighting technique that only your character knows. Special things get 5 bricks that can be added to any roll where the special thing might help. However, be careful, the 5 bricks go away once they are used. Some special things, like the one that you get during character creation, get their bricks back at the end of the adventure, and some of them simply go away. You can also use your special thing when describing your actions as much as you want, you only lose bricks when you use them to help a roll.

 

Brick Rating

You have a brick rating that will be used to determine how resistant you are to being defeated. Characters start with a brick rating of 4.

 

Game Mechanics

Actions

Your entire game will be spent doing actions. Most of the time these actions will be simple and easy. You won't have to roll for them, you just say you are doing them and that's the end of it.

 

Challenges

Sometimes an action will require bricks to complete. The GM will tell you how many bricks it will take to be able to complete the action. Then, you will get to roll some dice and see how many bricks your knight was able to get. If you were able to get at least as many bricks as you needed, then your knight was able to complete the action. How many bricks you will need is based on how difficult the action is:

 

Very Easy: 1 brick

Easy: 2 bricks

Moderate: 3 bricks

Difficult: 4 bricks

Very Difficult: 5 bricks

Heroic: 6 bricks

 

Learning From Your Mistakes

If your knight attempts a challenge and gets no bricks at all, then it means that your knight has learned from the mistake. You get to describe how your knight learned from his or her mistake and add a related skill to your skill list.

 

Helping

If you wish to help another character to overcome a challenge, then you may do so. Most often this is a simple thing and all you do is describe how you are helping and the other character gets to add a die to their roll. However, if it is a particularly complex challenge, or it would be hard for you to help, then you may have to succeed at your own challenge to see if you are able to help the other character.

 

Extended Challenges

On certain challenges it isn't so much a question of whether you will complete the action, but how much time you spend completing the action. In these cases, every time you roll, any bricks you get can be set aside and kept until you have enough bricks to succeed at the challenge. The most common extended challenge is combatting monsters, where the stronger ones might have more bricks than you can generate in a single roll. In more tense situations, there might be a limit to how many times you can attempt an extended challenge before you have failed at the action.

 

Contested Challenges

There will be times when you don't have just a static number of bricks that you need to succeed. You will also have another character actively opposing you. In those cases, you will both roll and the bricks your opponent gets will be subtracted from the number of bricks you get. The bricks left over will determine whether you succeeded at the challenge or not. Like extended challenges, the most common contested challenge is combatting monsters where monsters get to oppose attacks made against them.

 

Brick Ratings

All characters have a brick rating. If they lose those bricks through a challenge against them succeeding, they must take a new complication based on the outcome of the challenge.

 

Getting Rid of Complications

Many complications can never be gotten rid of entirely, but they can change. If it makes sense that a complication would change (or, rare as it is, go away entirely) then you simply make the change to your complication when it makes sense.

 

Bonus Pools

Every player (including the GM) gets a bonus pool of dice. Dice from the bonus pool can be added to any dice pool (even those rolled by other players) unless there have been dice added to a bonus pool from that dice pool.

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This is pretty cool, thanks for posting.

 

One suggestion... maybe you dismissed this as you wrote. But if you intend a simple game for kids, I suggest you create templates so that you can streamline the creation process. At the very least I'd create skill dice packages, along the lines of the old SW templates. Then your players can focus on the skills and whatnot. They are generally not going to be like former D&D players insistent on min-maxing, so they can jump right into skill assignment and you can move on with game prep.

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This is pretty cool, thanks for posting.

 

One suggestion... maybe you dismissed this as you wrote. But if you intend a simple game for kids, I suggest you create templates so that you can streamline the creation process. At the very least I'd create skill dice packages, along the lines of the old SW templates. Then your players can focus on the skills and whatnot. They are generally not going to be like former D&D players insistent on min-maxing, so they can jump right into skill assignment and you can move on with game prep.

 

Well, to simplify it, the skills are freeform and not rated. If a skill would help a roll you add a d6 to your pool. If multiple skills would help a roll you add a d6 for each. I could go ahead and list some skills that would be a part of a character archetype. Rpg.net suggested I add rules for building models (which makes sense since that is quintessential to Lego).

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