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Durran

D6 Fantasy (Dungeons & D6) Converting Monsters from D&D to D6 Fantasy

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Okay, so hopefully this is in the correct section since this is a general project of mine. Which I'm jokingly referring to D&D6 as shorthand, until I can come up with a more permanent title. My goal overall is to eventually convert all applicable monsters from D&D 3.5's Monster Manual I through V to standard D6 Fantasy. My hope is to eventually have enough in the way of creatures recorded that I will be able to run my own version of the Living Greyhawk setting in D6. After monsters are converted, my next step would be to work through divine & arcane spells so that there are ample pre-generated spells to cover most things a player might want to do with Magic & Miracles.

 

So far for my conversion cheat sheet, I've taken and expanded a bit on the guidelines presented at: Age of Enlightenment which presented some great broad strokes to get started with, but needed a touch of fine tuning and a bit of extra information to hopefully help speed the process along.

 

My Initial Conversion Guidelines

 

These are just rough notes that haven't been formatted for grammar or much more than automatic spell check, but hopefully this gives the idea of where I'm starting.

 

My pilot conversion was an adult Red Dragon, please feel free to give back any suggestions you might have.

 

Typical Adult Red Dragon:

Agility 2D+1: Fighting 9D+2, Dodge 7D+2, Flying 10D, Jumping 11D, Stealth 3D+2 (-12)

Coordination 2D+1: Marksmanship: Fire Breath 9D+2

Physique 6D: Lifting 10D, Stamina 10D+1

Intellect 3D+2: Scholar: Arcana 8D+2, Scholar: Local 8D+2, Trading: Appraisal 11D

Acumen 4D+1: Investigation 8D, Search 12D

Charisma 3D+2: Bluff 9D, Charm 9D+1, Intimidation 5D+2 (5D+14(+20 including frightful presence)) Mettle 10D, Persuasion 9D+1

Magic 3D+2: Alteration 6D, Apportation 6D, Divination 6D, Conjuration 6D

Strength Damage: 5D

Move: 12; 45 Flying (Hover)

Fate Points: 1-2

Character Points: 10

Body Points: 43

Wound Levels: 4

Scale: 12

Advantages:

Size (R4): Dragons are much larger than humans.

Disadvantages:

Achilles’ heel: Vulnerability to cold damage, double all damage rolls done by ice attacks.

Infamy (R3): Chromatic Dragons are hated by everyone -9 to all social interactions.

Quirk (R3): Vengeful: Red Dragons cannot stand to lose or be wronged. They will go to great lengths to avenge even imagined slights.

Quirk (R2): Greed: Dragons are notorious for their insatiable lust for treasure, especially Red Dragons. The Dragon must make a Mettle check every day it is awake, starting at moderate, and increasing by +5 every day thereafter, if the dragon fails, they will head out in search of new loot to add to their hoard.

Special Abilities:

Elemental Immunity: The Fire Dragon is immune to damage from fire sources.

Fire Breath: Range: 25m Cone, Damage: 8D+12 Fire Damage, 4D/round afterward until extinguished.

Frightful Presence (R6): -6 to resist intimidation checks made by the Dragon, -6 to defense rolls made against. As an action, the Dragon can invoke fear in anyone who can see or hear it. The affected character rolls Mettle vs. Difficulty 27. Failure by 16 or more, the character is frozen in terror, Failure by 9-15 the character immediately flees, and Failure by 1-8, the character gets the above affects and can act normally. A character who has failed can re-attempt his mettle check every round until he succeeds enough to be able to act on his own or get over his fear. Once a character succeeds his mettle check, that character is immune to the fear affect until some dramatic occurrence happens that may shake his resolve.

Natural Armor: +7D Damage Resistance

Natural Weapons: The Dragon’s Bite does +2D Damage, and Claws do +1D Damage, a tail swipe does +3D damage.

Spell Resistance: -21 to spell cast checks for harmful spells cast against Dragon

 

This is my first draft without any revisions, thus far.

 

I'm not particularly keen on the "Spell Resistance" special ability, and will probably either do away with it completely, or significantly down grade it.

 

Natural armor was calculated using the guidelines for converting armor on Age of Enlightenment, which will make an adult dragon a seriously dangerous opponent if the players are completely unprepared, but not an insurmountable one, since the dragon's scales can be bypassed with a called shot to a sensitive location.

 

The Dragon's breath weapon was another tricky ability to hammer down, and I think I'm okay with where it is at currently, I did a 1-1 exchange of the D10s from 3.5 to D6s, since this attack should be able to do reliable damage against buildings and other structures in addition to players.

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This is a good place to post, and welcome aboard!

 

I know you're doing a direct port-over, but I have to ask... do you like the convoluted nature of the stats that you get when you convert? All of the advantages, disadvantages, special abilities, and multitude of skills that detail every little thing about the dragon seem to really add too much nit-pick to what should be a big, powerful, monster. I blame D&D for having all of that stuff in their game system, but I never understood the need for it in D6. K.I.S.S. is a motto I attempt to stick to for most things in D6.

 

I'm just wondering YOUR thoughts on the amount of stats you created in the conversion for just a red dragon.

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Generally speaking, I would agree with you, keeping it simple is usually best. In this case, I'm looking at the setting, and I'm not sure if simple is best for this particular monster.

 

When I compare the stats between the original D6 Fantasy Fire Dragon and the Red Dragon from D&D, it's like comparing the Dragons from Reign of Fire to Smaug the Terrible. In the setting, each dragon is supposed to be a major antagonist: a named NPC if you prefer. When Bilbo ends up in the treasure room with Smaug in the Hobbit, they talk, and Smaug tries to trick Bilbo into revealing information about himself so that he can kill him more easily, not just opening up with his fire breath and BBQ every inch of the room to try and immediately kill the intruder, there's intelligent thought behind the monster. When you take a look in the D6 Fantasy Creatures guide, the creatures are statted out for whatever possible encounter they might be in, not just if the players get in a fight. For most monsters, the only stats that will matter will be how well they fight and what they can do in a fight. For a Dragon, the situation might end up with a Persuasion contest where each is trying to persuade the mayor of a village inside the Dragon's territory whether he keep sacrificing virgins, livestock, or gold to the Dragon or help the Players take the Dragon down. The nice thing about D6 over D&D, is that there are many more avenues a player can seek to accomplish a goal than just going out and killing stuff.

 

I'm sure that there will be some, maybe even many monsters that have superfluous stats and skills, I'm just not entirely convinced that a Dragon should be trimmed down simply to fighting ability. An adult red dragon has been surviving for 100-200 years; I would think in that time, it has become less than a slavering beast.

 

Thanks for the Welcome! I appreciate the feedback!

 

I don't expect this to be a quick project, I do expect it to take many months, possibly a year or two to finish. I'm not so concerned with bogging myself down with the work of converting every stat, since it's making up for the lack of gaming associated with my current situation.

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You could group the attributes by the Mini Six Attributes

Agility and Coordination are both Agility, Intellect, Magic, and Acumen are Wit, Body Points are a level of Soak, etc....

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K.I.S.S. is a motto I attempt to stick to for most things in D6.

 

First principles, Clarice. Simplicity. Read Marcus Aurelius. Of each particular thing ask: what is it in itself? What is its nature? What does he do, this man you seek? - Hannibal Lecter

 

Do not multiply entities beyond necessity - William of Occam

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You could group the attributes by the Mini Six Attributes

Agility and Coordination are both Agility, Intellect, Magic, and Acumen are Wit, Body Points are a level of Soak, etc....

 

Thanks for the suggestion, Nero. As I have only converted over 1 monster thus far, I'm not feeling totally overwhelmed by the standard OD6 attribute spread just yet. This might change as the project progresses; I might have a change of heart or mind sometime later down the road, but even then, it will probably be just as easy to scramble the attributes a little bit from D6 as to change my process at the beginning.

 

I'm coming from a stretch of 15 years playing WEG Star Wars: so while combining agility & coordination will be more familiar to me, I can see why they split them up when they re-hashed the system, because Dexterity was too important an attribute in that version of the game.

 

I'll definitely think on your suggestion.

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I'm hip. Retaining the flavor of D&D is muy importante. IMS someone at the WEG Yahoo list did a pfp conversion, D6&D6. Bring a slide-rule and some scratch paper.

 

I've been tinkering with Labyrinth Lord (B/X) and converting the more traditional monsters has proven trickery than I thought. Best guess. Build from the inside out, the basics form a skeleton and then gingerly add the extras, don't make too much work for yourself.

 

The unambitious nature of the groups I'm in hasn't pushed me beyond Hobgoblins or the occasional grey troll.

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I'm hip. Retaining the flavor of D&D is muy importante. IMS someone at the WEG Yahoo list did a pfp conversion, D6&D6. Bring a slide-rule and some scratch paper.

 

I've been tinkering with Labyrinth Lord (B/X) and converting the more traditional monsters has proven trickery than I thought. Best guess. Build from the inside out, the basics form a skeleton and then gingerly add the extras, don't make too much work for yourself.

 

The unambitious nature of the groups I'm in hasn't pushed me beyond Hobgoblins or the occasional grey troll.

 

This is very good advice. I'm already have trouble with the Aboleth (First monster in MM1) because it has mind control powers that just don't reflect well to the D6 system. I'm thinking about making the dominate person a difficulty 16 mettle test, which is then beefed up by the mettle roll of the intended target. It's pretty simple and the monster has to blast a player's willpower out +16 to be able to control them. Also, I was going to add in a rule where the Aboleth needs to make a mettle roll every time it gets hit Difficulty 16+ the amount of damage he takes. Even if he soaks it, the blow can disrupt his concentration and give the enslaved person a chance to escape.

 

I think that mind control can be a wonderful dramatic tool, so long as it isn't overpowered. The dominated character should get multiple chances to try and break free of the controller.

 

As for your inside out model, I agree. I'm hoping that with the direct conversions I retain the basic essence of the monster (the skeleton), then I just need to figure out how to fairly incorporate special abilities the monster possesses without breaking the game.

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After doing some exhaustive research, I decided to base the Enslave ability of an Aboleth off of Possession with a success degree. Some of the special abilities were easy enough to convert right over. I also decided to ditch their 5 or so spell abilities and replaced with one catch-all simplified one. I'll share the special abilities here:

 

Enslave: The Aboleth is able to attempt to control the mind of a living creature within 20m. The Aboleth and the target roll an opposed Mettle check. The effects are similar to the Possession power, except that there is a degree of success based on the amount the Aboleth beats its intended target’s mettle roll by. If the Aboleth rolls between 1 and 7 above the resistance, it has not managed to gain control of the target, but hasn’t been kicked out of the opponent’s mind. Both are incapable of taking any actions other than continuing the mental battle. If the Aboleth beats the target by 8 to 15, then it has limited control over the target, and must roll an opposed Mettle check to get the target to perform any action. If the target is beaten by 16 or more, then it performs commands the Aboleth gives it without hesitation. The Aboleth can keep this power up for 1 action. While possessed, the Aboleth can make an Acumen check to learn the thoughts of its enslaved target (Use the possession knowledge chart on page 37 of the D6 Fantasy main book). If the Aboleth is killed or flees, the enslaved creature is freed of the mind control. Player characters get a +5 bonus to resist mind control because their heroic nature is difficult to overcome.

Psychic Illusions: An Aboleth can make complex illusions to trick creatures into coming near its watery den. The Aboleth rolls its charisma +10 versus the opponent’s search or mettle, whichever is higher.

Natural Weapons: 4 Tentacles, it can attack with 2 per attack action at no multiple action penalties: +1D Damage

Slime: If a wound is suffered from an aboleth’s tentacle attack, the victim must make a difficult stamina check, or they begin a transformation (1D minutes) where their skin gradually becomes a clear, slimy membrane. It must remain moistened with cool, fresh water or suffer 2D damage every 10 minutes, this damage is not resisted by a character’s physique.

Mucus Cloud: An aboleth underwater surrounds itself with a viscous cloud of mucus roughly 1 foot thick. Any creature coming into contact with and inhaling this substance must make a difficult stamina check or lose the ability to breathe air for the next 3 hours. An affected creature must make stamina checks or drown outside of the water. Renewed contact with the mucus cloud and failing another stamina roll continues the effect for another 3 hours.

 

Any feedback is welcome. I'm trying to keep the feel for the monster while getting rid of D&D's tendency for "save or die" situations. In order to do that, I had to complicate things a bit.

 

I'm still considering giving the mind control power a chance to be disrupted if the Aboleth get's hit, but I'm not sure if that's too much detail.

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My thoughts:

 

Enslave - not bad what you have. I would suggest adding that if the creature is hit for damage, the roll for enslave must be made again at -1D to the creatures ability.

 

Illusions - not bad, but maybe a bit too much of a bonus to the creature.

 

Slime - WAY too harsh! I guess if you're making this to directly mimic the lethality of D&D, it works. But if you want your players to ever play with you again, you'll rethink this entire power. Any damage with the tentacle and they start transforming in 1D minutes. They take 2D damage every 10 minutes and can't resist it. Might as well say "If you take any damage from this creature, you're dead." because it's pretty much the same thing. Just the way the slime reads now, it's a drawn out process of death, but a guaranteed outcome.

 

A couple of suggestions: Change it so that if the damage results in the PC becoming Mortally wounded, then they must make a Difficult Stamina check or begin to transform. The transformation can be hindered with something and stopped completely with something else. Basically, give them the ability to stop (temporarily or permanently) the transformation, and don't have it happen until the PC is in a badly weakened state.

 

Mucus Cloud - Not sure about the usefulness of this one. Underwater, cloud a foot thick, and someone coming in contact (okay, possible) or inhaling (how? Underwater?) Effect is not breathe air for 3 hours. Does that mean they can breathe something else? Water? The Mucus?

 

As far as the level of detail, you're going to have to decide how much or how little you want in your D6 games. Personally, I'd ditch the Mucus Cloud completely. It SCREAMS munchkin, which a number of things in D&D do. Keep what you think fits appropriately, change what is ridiculous (as you mentioned, the tendency of Save vs. Death for so many creatures), and add what you think makes it better.

 

Don't attempt a "direct conversion". Just use the material more like "guidelines" and tweak as necessary. You'll be happier with the outcome.

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Enslave - not bad what you have. I would suggest adding that if the creature is hit for damage, the roll for enslave must be made again at -1D to the creatures ability.

 

Excellent suggestion, I was thinking having it make a moderate mettle check +1 per point of damage inflicted by the attack. Either works.

 

Illusions - not bad, but maybe a bit too much of a bonus to the creature.

 

Good idea, I dropped the bonus to +5.

 

Slime - WAY too harsh! I guess if you're making this to directly mimic the lethality of D&D, it works. But if you want your players to ever play with you again, you'll rethink this entire power. Any damage with the tentacle and they start transforming in 1D minutes. They take 2D damage every 10 minutes and can't resist it. Might as well say "If you take any damage from this creature, you're dead." because it's pretty much the same thing. Just the way the slime reads now, it's a drawn out process of death, but a guaranteed outcome.

 

Yeah, the slime was tricky, I've toned it down to the following, and made a few ways to get rid of it:

 

Slime: If a character is brought to incapacitated status from an Aboleth’s tentacle attack, the victim must make a difficult stamina check, or they begin a transformation (1D minutes) where their skin gradually becomes a clear, slimy membrane. It must remain moistened with cool, fresh water or suffer 2D damage every 10 minutes, this damage is not resisted by a character’s physique. This can be cured by a moderate Healing Miracle, or a Difficult Alteration Magic check.

 

Mucus Cloud - Not sure about the usefulness of this one. Underwater, cloud a foot thick, and someone coming in contact (okay, possible) or inhaling (how? Underwater?) Effect is not breathe air for 3 hours. Does that mean they can breathe something else? Water? The Mucus?

 

They have to stay underwater, I made some edits to infer that. I also added in a GM caveat, so they can have the creature have it or not, depending on what they want. I think that this could be an interesting story hook, if say the Aboleth is guarding the pool to an underwater dungeon. The players may have to purposefully fail their checks so they can breathe underwater to explore the ruins. But, it is a high level of detail... I guess it's my completion-ism that makes me want to convert over all of the abilities of a creature, instead of just cherry picking a couple. I already skipped on the Aboleth Mage entry, since it seems redundant. A GM could easily add the Magic Attribute and appropriate skills without needing a separate entry.

 

For the most part, I'm already using the direct conversion as more of a guideline and shifting skill points and attribute points where I feel it's appropriate. However, some of the creatures have so many special abilities, it seems like a disservice to not include everything. The Psychic Illusion special ability is the combination of all of the Aboleth's illusion spells rolled into one skill. So instead of having to put: Psionics (Sp): At will—hypnotic pattern (DC 15), illusory wall (DC 17), mirage arcana (DC 18), persistent image (DC 18), programmed image (DC 19), project image (DC 20), veil (DC 19). Effective caster level 16th. The save DCs are Charisma-based, I rolled everything into a single ability that allows it to create complex illusions, and made it a Charisma check instead of writing up a new skill for it or adding in additional magic skills.

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I was thinking....

 

Bad way to start a post.

 

I've been skimming through the OSRIC rules, is there a way to use the Mini Six 'basic' dragon with add-on rules that would give it a D&D feel and not let it get too far afield? A dragon racial package? Treat characteristics as skills tied to attributes.

 

I'm still at the point where a Stone Troll hits a little harder and has a little more Soak than a Grey Troll. It lacks a certain something.

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How dare you think while participating in a sharing of intellectual ideas! Haha, ;) Kidding, of course.

 

Interesting concept of making the racial packages. I'm intrigued at the idea of it, and may make a set of racial templates for monster characters in the future, working in some sort of CP penalty until they buy out the cost of the template.

 

I've been so busy the last few days that I'm still only 2 monsters "complete" out of probably a thousand or so. Maybe I'll make a list and start striking them off as I make progress.

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Pace yourself with monster conversions. I did a bunch of that for a Risus B/X. A set of guideline would have probably been a good idea.

 

Ideally a lightly modified character sheet for monsters. I crib the monster listings as they are in the Mini Six book, and wing the extras.

 

A template would be a good starting point.

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Devil's Advocate

 

How does Acumen differ from Intellect? Would a skill set function the same?

 

Would Size be implied under Scale?

 

Is Marksmanship necessary for Breath Weapon? Could breath Weapon be take as a skill?

 

Typical Adult Red Dragon

 

Dragon

 

Scale: +4D (+4D/+12 to Dodge & Soak)

 

 

Might: 4D

 

 

Wit: 4D

 

 

Agility: 2D

 

 

Charm: 3D

 

Skills: Brawling 5D, Breath Attack 5D

 

Attacks: Bite (character scale, 8D damage) or

Bite (dragon scale, 4D damage)

Tail Bash (character scale, 4D damage),

Breath Fire (3D damage, range 60 ft)

Perks: Scales (+3 armor),

Fly 90 ft/round

Static: Dodge 6, Block 15, Soak 12 (15)

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Devil's Advocate

 

How does Acumen differ from Intellect? Would a skill set function the same?

 

Acumen: mental keenness

Intellect: capacity for knowledge, the capacity for rational thought

 

So they differ in terms of ability vs. capacity

 

 

Would Size be implied under Scale?

 

Seeing as how I've done extensive work on scale, I can say that while size CAN have a play in Scale, it is not so implied with scale. Is a blimp the same scale as a 747, though they are similar sizes? Or is the 747 substantially more durable, as implied by scale, than a great big bag of potentially flammable lighter-than-air gas?

 

Is Marksmanship necessary for Breath Weapon? Could breath Weapon be take as a skill?

 

How many skills do you want? It could be a skill, but usually only if you want to have a wide number of skills. If you're using Mini Six, generally you want to keep things more simple. Use Marksmanship.

 

Typical Adult Red Dragon

 

Dragon

 

Scale: +4D (+4D/+12 to Dodge & Soak)

 

 

Might: 4D

 

 

Wit: 4D

 

 

Agility: 2D

 

 

Charm: 3D

 

Skills: Brawling 5D, Breath Attack 5D

 

Attacks: Bite (character scale, 8D damage) or

Bite (dragon scale, 4D damage)

Tail Bash (character scale, 4D damage),

Breath Fire (3D damage, range 60 ft)

Perks: Scales (+3 armor),

Fly 90 ft/round

Static: Dodge 6, Block 15, Soak 12 (15)

 

Interesting dragon, and interesting scale differences for the various attacks. What scale would the Breath Fire attack be at?

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That's simply an expanded version of the generic adult dragon from Bare Bones. I'm trying to figure out if skills can replace some of the attributes of the red dragon from page one.

 

Acumen is tracking and observation, Marksmanship for fire breath is just more points added to fire breath, etc.....

 

I've never used Scale in Mini Six, I think I get the idea.

 

Typical Adult Red Dragon - Mark I

 

 

Scale: +4D/+12 to Dodge & Soak

 

 

Might: 4D

Brawling

 

Wit: 4D

Scholar: Arcana

Scholar: Local

Tracking

Observation

 

 

Agility: 2D

Flying

Jumping

Stealth

 

 

Charm: 3D

Bluff

Charm

Frightful Presence/ Intimidation

 

 

Attacks: Bite (character scale, 8D damage) or

Bite (dragon scale, 4D damage)

Tail Bash (character scale, 4D damage),

Breath Fire (3D damage, range 60 ft)

 

 

Perks:

Scales (+3 armor),

Fly 90 ft/round

Magic Aptitude (magic is taken in spells not classes)

Spell Resistance

Immune from fire damage (1/2 damage)

 

Quirks:

Greed

Vulnerability to cold (X2 damage)

Infamy

Vengeful

 

Static: Dodge 6, Block 15, Soak 12 (15)

 

 

Hero Points: 1-2

Character Points: 10

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Would Size be implied under Scale?

 

According to the D6 fantasy book, which I used for a guidelines for size/scale, then yes, size is implied under scale. Which makes some sense, since there aren't tanks and starships rolling around in most high fantasy settings. The scale setting for the adult dragon I picked so that it would be able to easily destroy homes if it unleashed its wrath on a town, while being close to the approximate size listed in the Draconomicon.

 

Is Marksmanship necessary for Breath Weapon? Could breath Weapon be take as a skill?

 

Six of one, half dozen of another. Marksmanship is used for all non-thrown ranged attack rolls, so even if it got changed to an independent skill, the result would be the same, just with less characters printed.

 

I appreciate you taking the time to save me some work, I'll keep checking back as the project progresses, when it picks up again. My daughter has been on an especially difficult sleeping schedule lately, and I've only been out of bed for an hour on the West Coast, USA. So, just waking up in time to see the sun go down in a few hours.

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Speaking of Trolls.

 

Maybe I should stat the goblinoid family tree? Goblinkin are the backbone of mooks for slaughter when heroes do their daring do.

Goblins

Hobgoblins

Orcs

Trolls

Ogres

Bugbears

 

Goblins

 

A goblin stands 3' to 3 1/2' tall. Its eyes are usually dull and glazed, varying in color from red to yellow. Their eyes

sometimes flicker red in the dark. A goblin's skin color ranges from yellow through any shade of orange to a deep red;

usually all members of a single tribe are about the same color. - from LL

 

Scale:0

 

Might: 2D

Spear +2D

Club +1D+1

 

Wit: 3D

Area Knowledge: Lair and surrounding lands

Tracking

Pack Tactics

 

Agility: 3D

Throw: spear 2D

Throw: rock 1D

Dodge +2

Stealth

 

Charm: 1D

Inspire Revulsion

Intuitive Teamwork

 

Perks:

Low light vision

One of many (opponent's melee attack a - 3)

Revolting visage

 

Quirks:

Vulnerable to sunlight

seldom wears armor

 

Attacks:

By weapon

Spear

Club

Knife

Occasionally sword

Rarely bow

 

or force of numbers

Teeth

Claws

 

Static: Dodge, Block, Soak

 

Hero Points: N/A

 

Character Points: 4

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Absolutely, I'm mostly curious how they compare with one another. I'm going to see if I can crank out a quick conversion today.

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Okay, this is what I came up with for a typical goblin warrior:

 

Typical Goblin:

This little humanoid has a flat face, broad nose, pointed ears, wide mouth, and small, sharp fangs. It walks upright, but its arms hang down almost to its knees.

 

Agility 3D: Dodge, Fighting 3D+1, Melee 3D+1, Riding 3D(+2), Stealth 3D(+2)

Coordination 3D: Marksmanship 3D+1

Physique 2D+2: Lifting 3D, Stamina 3D+1

Intellect 2D+1:

Acumen 2D: Hide 3D, Search 2D (+3),

Charisma 1D+1: Mettle 1D+1

Strength Damage: 2D

Move: 10

Fate Points: 0

Character Points: 0-2

Body Points: 10

Wound Levels: 1-2

Scale: -3

Advantages: None.

Disadvantages: None.

Special Abilities:

Skill Bonus: Goblin Skills: +2 to Riding & Stealth

Skill Bonus: Alertness: +3 to search.

Darkvision: Goblins can see in the dark with no penalties.

Edited by Durran
Forgot the Darkvision ability.

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One nit pick you are going to get tired of.........

 

My GM for FlatEarth didn't like Infravision, he substituted sonar and dark adapted eyes for goblinkin, and sonar, heightened senses, and cat's eye for elves; dwarves and gnomes have 'stone sense'.

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