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Grimace

Movement and Chases: What's best?

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Movement in OpenD6 is basically expressed in two values: a numberical value based on meters moved per round, and sometimes an additional value based on kilometers per hour.

 

Additionally, when you move in OpenD6, you can choose to move one of four speeds: Cautious, Cruising, High, and All-Out. Cautious is half the listed move, Cruising is the regular move, High is twice the value of move, and All-Out is four times the value of move.

 

So if a vehicle can move 60, the fastest it can ever go is 240 when it's going at All-Out. Two vehicles with the same move of 60 would both be going to same speed. This makes chases and races rather predictable, it seems.

 

I've seen people mention that older renditions of D6 did chases and races better by having a dice value for movement rather than a static number. So instead of moving 10, you have a movement rating of 2D. So you roll 2D and that's how far you move. This made for much more variable races and chases, as one side could pull ahead with some good rolls and then falter with some poor rolls.

 

And then there's been some fan-made movement rules that make changes to the way things work.

 

So my question for everyone is this: Are you happy with the movement rules in D6? Would you rather it be done differently? If so, how would you like it?

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I have not many chases in my games (mostly due to player actions) but I'm pretty happy with fixed move values. In vehicle chases (if both parts have the same kind of vehicle), the one who really wants to scape/capture the other, must take some risks when choosing speeds, and I encourage the use of creative stunts to get some extra distance over the other. Adding the wild dice to that...

 

 

About the older ratings in dies, they were not very apreciated around here (can only speak about a few people) because they added a lot of dice rolling to a game, but I still reserve them for areas were there are a lot of obstacles (a crowded market, a forest, etc.) just adding 1D to the fixed value. But I have only used this on foot chases, and fudging a little some things :-P

Edited by kellhound

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Admittedly I'm rusty since I haven't played a D6 game since last year and I haven't ran once in much longer, but am I totally missing something here? Even with speed being based on static numbers, you still have to roll vs. the terrain difficulty you are travelling in and factor in any special manuevers you are doing. Failure means something bad happens. When vehicle speed was die codes, you added those to your roll so there were more dice rolled, but not more dice rolls.

 

As far as Grimace's question, I think you mean when both parties in the chase are making all of their movement rolls and going the same speed. The first way to address this is to interpret the rolls and interject some relativity. When both parties make their movement rolls, make the total distance the rules say they travelled into a mean between the two, and the one who beats the difficulty by a greater amount travels a little bit more than the distance, and the one who rolls less goes a little less. So the chasee either gets further away or the chaser closes in.

 

Another things GMs can do is introduce obstacles that increase the difficulty unexpectedly. If you want some more of that SW 1E randomness factor than you can use dice to randomly introduce terrain changes. To think about it in somewhat realistic terms, a pilot is not always going to know about changes to the terrain or obstacles up ahead during a high speed chase. So at the beginning of the round, the players declare their speed based on the the terrain (and thus difficulty) information that is available to them at that moment, and then as they move that distance through the round, things may change that they didn't account for at the beginning.

 

So I think that the static move values for vehicles (and characters) work fine if the GM just interprets rolls for the level of success and interjects some challeges along the way as needed to spice up chases and/or make them less predictible. Good chase scenes in movies are often loaded with surprises for both parties, so good cinematic roleplaying should follow suit.

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In general, I prefer abstract movement to fixed numbers. Is anyone here familiar with the old Dragonlance Fifth Age SAGA System? I like the way that game handles movement.

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