Lee Torres

[D6 Legend] D6 Legend 101 (from the WEG Archives)

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This is step one in the D6 Legend System - but in follow-up posts, I'll be rolling out a number of modifications published by various contributors, notably Mike Lynes, Francois Letarte, Jerry D. Grayson, and Ken Burnside, to demonstrate how much the basic system can be streamlined.

 

Comparing the D6 and Legend Systems

 

If you're a fan of our D6 System, you may be curious about how easy it will be for you to learn the variants used in some of our new games. (If you don't know about the D6 System, you can look here for more information.) This essay highlights the significant differences between D6 and its most recent variant, the Legend system, though it won't teach you the systems. At their heart, all D6 games follow the same basic principle: Roll a number of six-sided dice equal to the character's skill or attribute score. If the total generated equals or exceeds the difficulty number, then the character succeeds. As with all uses of the D6 system, attributes, skills, and other character details are tailored to the genre of the game. The main differences appear in generating totals, the difficulty numbers, and combat.

 

Generating Totals

 

In D6, you roll normal six-sided dice with pips or numbers to come up with your totals. When you roll the specified amount of dice (as determined by your character's attribute score, skill score, weapon score, and so on), you add the numbers to get your total.

 

With Legend, you can use normal six-sided dice or custom six-sided dice that have symbols instead of numbers on them. As with D6, you roll a designated number of dice. However, instead of adding the numbers, you count successes to figure out the total. (This also means that there are no pips in the Legend system.)

 

On a normal die, a 1 or 2 is a failure while a 3, 4, 5, or 6 is a success. (On the Wild Die, 1 is a critical failure; 2 is a failure; 3, 4, and 5 are successes; and 6 is a critical success.) The custom dice, typically called Hero Dice, have symbols representing critical failures, failures, successes, and critical successes, making it much easier to count successes.

 

Hero Dice

Regular Normal Die                 Regular Hero Die
1, 2                               Failure (0)
3-6                                Success (1)

Wild Normal Die                    Wild Hero Die
1                                  Critical failure (-1)
2                                  Failure (0)
3-5                                Success (1)
6                                  Critical success (+1, and roll again)

 

Difficulties

 

D6 uses a range of difficulty numbers from 1 to 31 and higher. With normal six-sided dice, there's a larger range of values that can be generated with a few dice.

 

Because the range of values produced by counting successes is much smaller, the range of difficulties is also lesser. In the case of the Legend system, this range is from 1 to 10 and higher. Using the difficulty numbers, however, remains the same in both systems.

 

Difficulty Chart

 

[b]D6 [/b]                                         [b]Legend[/b]
Very Easy (1-5)                             Very Easy (1)
Easy (6-10)                                 Easy (2), Moderate (3)
Moderate (11-15)                            Difficult (4), Very Difficult (5)
Difficult (16-20)                           Extremely Difficult (6), Heroic (7)
Very Difficult (21-26)                      Very Heroic (8), Super Heroic (9)
Heroic (26-30)                              Legendary (10)

 

Combat

 

The gist of combat is essentially the same between D6 and its variants: The attacker rolls his combat skill, attempting to beat a difficulty number. If successful, he rolls to see how much damage is done. This section offers key differences between D6 and Legend. Be sure to peruse the combat section in the rules chapter of the appropriate game for further and more complete details.

 

Difficulty Number: The difficulty number in Legend is not a static number, as it is in D6. Rather, it's based on a fraction or roll of the character's Reflexes or dodge score and adjusted by a range modifier.

 

Dodging: In Legend, when a character dodges, the total generated is used in place of the difficulty number based on the attribute or skill score, not added to that number (as it is in the most popular version of D6).

 

Body Points: Wound levels aren't used in the Legend system. Rather, damage is taken off of Body Points, which are determined at character creation.

 

Weapon Damage: To reduce the large number of dice a player would need to roll for many weapons, the Legend system uses die codes times multipliers instead of straight die codes. For example, a handgun has a damage value of 5Dx2. A player would roll five dice and multiply the total number of success by two-instead of having to roll 10 dice. (The first critical success on the Wild Die is only counted once.)

 

Effect Value: Unlike in D6, getting high totals on your combat rolls with the Legend system has an influence on how much damage is done. The Effect Value is determined by subtracting the difficulty number from the success total. This value is then added to the amount of damage done.

 

Remember...One aspect hasn't changed in any variation of the D6 system, and that's the idea of having fun. If you do that, it really doesn't matter what the rules say.

Edited by Lee Torres

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Very cool post. Really helped me understand the D6 Legend System (I kind of like the dice system, although I like the normal dice system as well).

 

Thank you for posting this primer

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Thanks for this 101. I've never played any "Legends" games so this helps me understand the system.

 

I do have the Assault on Hoth game and I guess the dice provided in the game used this idea. The faces of the dice all had black Vader-heads or blue lightsabers. The last time I played the game was New Year's Eve 1999, and after all these years, the faces of the dice are mostly all worn off now so I would have to use regular dice to play the game.

 

But if remember right, the Vaders were sucesses for the Imperial player, while the sabers were sucesses for the Rebel player. So I'm guessing it was probably 3 to 3, instead of 4 to 2 (successes to failures).

 

Can anyone confirm that? I would like to play the game again someday!

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Found this here: http://www.echostation.com/echo6/6weggame.htm

 

As in TESB, snowspeeders can destroy Walkers via harpoon and tow cables, but the speeder must be alongside the Walker and hope that the "Harpoon" card is turned over and that the proper dice roll is accomplished. The dice in Attack on Hoth are not your standard six-sided dice; these dice feature two sides with a lightsaber, two sides with a helmeted Vader face, and two blank sides. Attacks and defenses are resolved by rolling a certain number of these dice - the Rebel side is looking to roll sabers, the Imperials, obviously, want to roll Vaders.

They're Star Wars FUDGE dice! If you'll excuse me, I'll be over at eBay, looking for this game... :D

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I have a question on skill rolls. The way I understand it is your total die pool is equal to your stat + skill. But if you have a specialization that adds dice also. For example Grugnar is in a fight lets say he uses his Str 3 + Melee 2 he rolls 5 dice, but lets say under melee he has Clubs 2. So if Grugnar picks up a club he gets to roll a total of 7 dice?

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I have a question on skill rolls. The way I understand it is your total die pool is equal to your stat + skill. But if you have a specialization that adds dice also. For example Grugnar is in a fight lets say he uses his Str 3 + Melee 2 he rolls 5 dice, but lets say under melee he has Clubs 2. So if Grugnar picks up a club he gets to roll a total of 7 dice?

 

 

Wish there was more to say in response, but you nailed it. The specialization adds dice to the total pool.

 

Oh, there is more to say - Welcome to the forums! :D

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Wish there was more to say in response, but you nailed it. The specialization adds dice to the total pool.

 

Oh, there is more to say - Welcome to the forums! :D

 

Thanks been lurking here for a while

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You can read it here - start at page 55:

 

http://dansego.com/matrix/MatrixD6Legend_Nov03.doc#_Toc55992499

 

In many ways, it's like the wound point system used in the new D6 Core trilogy, but you roll successes for your hit, then, in the cases of firearms, use the Base Damage Value and the multiplier to determine the final amount of damage. Now I'll admit when I first saw it in DC Universe I thought it was a good thing, in that your hero could stand up to a lot of punishment, like in the comics. After using it a few times, though, it felt (to me, anyway) like you can withstand a bit too much. I've been using the house rules for wound levels like in the old WEG Star Wars rules since that realization, and have found I prefer it. It just seemed like a heavy pistol doing 5Dx3 damage, and with a 67% chance per die rolled of a success, that you'd end up doing maybe 9-12 points of damage with a heavy pistol, and if you succeed with all five dice a whopping 15, when the characters have a base number of 20 points that they then roll to add to at character creation (see page 7 - so 20 points is below the minimum). In fairness, automatic fire, from an assault rifle, for example, is rather deadly. I just think a .45 should be a little deadlier, as it is in Classic D6.

 

That said, if I was running a D6 Legend version of an 80's film like Die Hard, Commando, Rambo, or Lethal Weapon, I might dust off the original system instead. I just like the characters in games I run to be "at risk" - I remember reading in an RPG once to create a "danger-worthy" character, and I thought that was a good thing. Have the characters in real danger, not "I'll be in the hospital for 30 minutes after THIS savage beating."

 

But check it out, see what you think...

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You can read it here - start at page 55:

 

http://dansego.com/matrix/MatrixD6Legend_Nov03.doc#_Toc55992499

 

In many ways, it's like the wound point system used in the new D6 Core trilogy, but you roll successes for your hit, then, in the cases of firearms, use the Base Damage Value and the multiplier to determine the final amount of damage. Now I'll admit when I first saw it in DC Universe I thought it was a good thing, in that your hero could stand up to a lot of punishment, like in the comics. After using it a few times, though, it felt (to me, anyway) like you can withstand a bit too much. I've been using the house rules for wound levels like in the old WEG Star Wars rules since that realization, and have found I prefer it. It just seemed like a heavy pistol doing 5Dx3 damage, and with a 67% chance per die rolled of a success, that you'd end up doing maybe 9-12 points of damage with a heavy pistol, and if you succeed with all five dice a whopping 15, when the characters have a base number of 20 points that they then roll to add to at character creation (see page 7 - so 20 points is below the minimum). In fairness, automatic fire, from an assault rifle, for example, is rather deadly. I just think a .45 should be a little deadlier, as it is in Classic D6.

 

That said, if I was running a D6 Legend version of an 80's film like Die Hard, Commando, Rambo, or Lethal Weapon, I might dust off the original system instead. I just like the characters in games I run to be "at risk" - I remember reading in an RPG once to create a "danger-worthy" character, and I thought that was a good thing. Have the characters in real danger, not "I'll be in the hospital for 30 minutes after THIS savage beating."

 

But check it out, see what you think...

 

Thanks, I forgot to look there. I got the Matrix (both versions) Printed out.

My brother is thinking about running survival horror game. I blame it on him playing too much fallout3. His Idea is to give lesser zombies only 2 or 3 hit levels. With larger mutants a lot more than humans.

 

He said the legend way of rolling was more appealing to him for this style of game.

 

Myself, Im sold on the classic system. Although I could see how legend could work good for some styles of game.

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In one of the D6 Legend threads I started back in the day, there's a summary of Francois Letarte's D6 Legend rules for wound levels - works really well, and you can knock down mooks, zombies, small dogs, etc., to lower wound levels so they'll put up less fuss. Francois posts here as D6&D6, so if you have any questions you can shoot him a PM!

 

Hope that helps, and that your brother has fun taking out hordes of brain-hungry deaders... :eek:

Edited by Lee Torres

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In one of the D6 Legend threads I started back in the day, there's a summary of Francois Letarte's D6 Legend rules for wound levels - works really well, and you can knock down mooks, zombies, small dogs, etc., to lower wound levels so they'll put up less fuss. Francois posts here as D6&D6, so if you have any questions you can shoot him a PM!

 

Hope that helps, and that your brother has fun taking out hordes of brain-hungry deaders... :eek:

 

Thanks Lee

 

Of course you can. I have the intention of coming back to D6 this years and of course it will be D6 Legend way

 

Greetings

 

François

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Thanks Lee

 

Of course you can. I have the intention of coming back to D6 this years and of course it will be D6 Legend way

 

Greetings

 

François

 

You, sir, have made my week! Is this involved?

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I look forward to seeing this as I will be rolling out a D6 Legends variant aimed at simplifying and shortening the core rules at some point in the near future.

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