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skeloric

Some days I worry.

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I worry that I am an avid horseman in the age of automobiles.

I worry that I'm the guy being snide about those who have just turned a perfectly good pantry into an indoor bathroom when an outhouse and sears roebuck catalog will do just fine.

I worry that I am the guy declaring that radio is good enough for me while everyone else has a brand new black and white television.

I worry that maybe I'm the guy with the black and white television looking askance at the color televisions that just arrived in the store.

I worry that I am a relic of an earlier age and that none will notice when I am gone after having lived my span of years.

I worry that when they come to dispose of my belongings, there will be churlish comments such as, "Books? He has real physical books? Who bothers having actual books any more?" or "What the hell is a TORG RPG? You ever remember a computer game by that name?"

How about, "This guy had these VHS tape things? Damn, i saw one in a museum once. Didn't know there was any reason to still own any."

 

I feel OLD.

I feel like i have lived too many years and the world has changed too much around me and that I am a forgotten thing that did not get the planned upgrade that everyone else seemed to get.

 

Mostly I worry that the things I love the most will be the sorts of things that newer generations will snort with derisive laughter upon discovery.

 

And I am only 39.

The world is speeding up and I can't keep up with it anymore.

Do I sound fatalistic?

I'm trying not to but I wonder if prior generations ever had as much to lament the passing of as my generation?

I lived through 8-tracks and vinyl records (45s and albums), VHS and cassette.

I have seen the arrival of the first home video game systems (Atari Pong and Studio 2 and Atari 2600 then to the Nintendo Entertainment System)

I have seen the first home computers and now I can place on a single CD every computer game I ever owned or wanted to own from the first ten years of personal computers.

I have watched the early cell phones be so large and bulky that only the most pedantic seemed to think they worthwhile to seeing them everywhere.

I have seen things I once though were only possible in Sci-Fi become scientific and technological fact.

I can now carry hundreds of music CDs in a small unit the size of a "Matchbox Car" and listen to them.

the computer that arrived in my lifetime allows me to communicate with the whole world or at least the portion of it currently reading these words.

I was only a baby when men first walked on the moon it is true, but men may one day soon walk on Mars.

The Mars of H.G. Wells.

The Mars of John Carter.

The Mars of Ray Bradbury.

For all time, the fantasy of Mars will be slain by the reality of Mars -- though some may argue that it has already.

 

What will I see in my next forty years?

Can I bear it?

Can I still look towards the future to see my irrelevance approaching from out of the fog of eternity, coming to claim me on some future day?

Or will I look away?

Recede the depths and hope that the cruel thing passes me by?

I don't know.

Maybe by receding, I instead accept that cruel irrelevance.

 

But I finally find myself fearing the very existence of a future.

That there will be a day beyond the sum of my years.

That there will be a time when they look back upon this age and scoff at the way we lived or look upon us with pity for not having lived into their age of marvels.

And I find myself hating them for their scoffing and their pity.

I have lived through wonders and I have seen marvels.

What makes their future so much greater than the time I have upon the Earth?

And why do I find myself thinking that some person in a prior age thought these same thoughts as I and that I fancifully feel their hate for our scoffing and our pity we lavish upon their age in the sun?

 

But will i get to see all the marvels i ever hoped to see come to pass?

Will I find myself suffering the fate of Moses, able to look into that promised land but never journey there myself?

 

Mostly I fear that my footprint upon my span of years will be small and that I will one day be forgotten completely.

 

Ever have one of those deep, deep thoughts that threatens to drown you?

I seem to be there.

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You know, I would have said I worry for you.....

 

 

But you seem to have it covered,

 

 

LOL

 

 

Dude, if you don't like it, Change it, its your life, nobody else is going to live it for you,

 

You haven't got it that bad,

But think of the people worse off, without all the things you take for granted

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In 1988 an 89, I was already simultaneously running 2 Star Wars campaigns with two different player groups, and I still had people busting down my door to get into my games.

 

I worry that now I won't find enough players to play in my next Star Wars D6 table-top campaign, because people would rather play:

 

1) Star Wars D20

2) D&D or other games

3) video/computer RPGs

4) by post games

5) occasional one-shot adventures and not want to commit to a longer-term campaign

6) nothing due to lack of interest or life situations like relationships, family, work, etc.

 

But I am still creating and eventually printing 7 player handbooks for my "3rd edition" of Star Wars D6. I am still planning my smugglers-to-heroes campaign taking place in the years leading up to Episode IV. I have to finish these things because I've already been working on them for years now. I can't just quit half-way now.

 

My plan all along has been that once people see these player handbooks designed for optimal layout and ease of use, they will think they are so cool and won't be able to stop themselves from playing.

 

I do still have all those fears in my above list, but I am holding on to the hope that "if I build it, they will come."

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I think everyone thinks along these lines at one point or another in their lifetime. I went through all the same things you did skel, I'm just a couple years your younger.

 

I don't think there's anything wrong with being content with what you have already. And if you don't want to change then you don't have to. If you want to change, do it at your own pace, don't let anyone tell you that you have to do this or that 'NOW'. Take what you want, pass by what you don't.

 

I realize that some things have to be learned out of necessity because the changes take place and the old ways are swept away and I think that's your main concern here. The way I see it, if your life isn't changed by the things being changed, then you don't have to change. :D

 

Live, Love and be Loved, an excellent philosophy.

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And in general, I can relate to some of the things in skel's post. I'm in my late 30's. I always was and still am late in adopting new technologies and other changes.

 

When I was a kid my mom still played her transistor radio (AM-only) from her high school years (until I took it apart to see how it worked). But my parents also had this state-of-the-art (70's) big chest floor stereo with a record player, 8-track (the precursor to cassette tapes) and the revolutionary AM + FM radio.

 

I not only remember records, I still have some of my original records from the early 80's, when cassette tapes became more popular. I refused to cross over because you can't go directly to the song you want to hear on a tape. I was still buying records into the late 80's, but when the cruising years began, I realized that you can't play a record in car. So I finally started bying cassettes when CDs started to gain popularity. But you couldn't play CDs in cars so I stayed with cassettes. Even as the first generations of car CD players came out, they skipped all the time so I stuck with cassettes. And I made "mixed-tapes" from my records for cars. But then years into college when everyone I knew was building up their CD collections in the early 90's, I finally realized the other advantages of CDs and slowly got into them. I'm not sure exactly when but sometime in the 90's cassettes just disappeared from music stores. I traded my original 80's record player for the Led Zeppelin boxed set on CD. I still made mixed tapes from my CDs for the car until I finally got my first car with a CD player in 2004, the car I still drive now.

 

I have still not crossed over in to the digital music realm yet, even though my wife has. I am not really a materialistic person, but digital music is just too intangible for me. I have downloaded music from iTunes, but just to burn it onto a disc. I still like published CDs better, because I like having the artwork and inserts and such. I know that someday I won't be able to buy CDs because they won't exist. I have a 60-CD juke box that can hold about 1000 songs when filled to capacity (with near-capacity cda CDs). I hear that's nothing compared to what I could put in an iPod.

 

I remember one of my friends from a well-off family had a beta video player, but the only movie I ever watched on it was Raiders of the Lost Ark. I had VHS starting in the late 80's, but didn't cross over to DVDs until 2000 when Star Wars Episode I came out. And even then I still bought some new VHS tapes until 2005 when Lucas didn't even bother releasing Star War Episode III on that format. Now I don't even see VHS at Wal-Mart anymore (but I still have a 4-head VCR for the movies I never upgraded to DVD). And actually I still occasionally go online to order VHS tapes of old movies because they are so dirt cheaps sometimes.

 

I just finally got e-mail, internet and a home computer for the first time in 2002, the same computer I'm using right now. I got it mainly to burn mixed CDs, internet research, communication with others and data/media processing, and these uses haven't really changed in over 6 years. I can't imagine being without it now.

 

I just got a cell phone for the first time in 2004 only because I was dating at the time and didn't want to miss calls when I wasn't home. I would probably still have the original phone if I hadn't dropped it in a pool in 2006. Now I have a qwerty phone and can't imagine life without texting.

 

But you know what? I'm still a bit nostalgic for the old days in some ways. I started a new hobby a few years ago of collecting records. Some of my favorite music is classic rock and film score, so my musical tastes go back into the 60's and 70's. There are pleny of great albums to get. But I'm too practical to only collect them, so I bought a new record player that is compatible with my juke box stereo. I already own most of the records I buy (on CD), but I don't listen to records to hear quality recordings. I listen to records for ambiance. Sometimes it's just nice to hear the occasional little snaps, crackles and pops.

 

I do somewhat understand the feelings of being out of place (or "out of time") in our fast-changing world. But I just put on a KISS record or look up at my (out of the package) Star Wars figures displays on top of two of my book shelves, and I feel more continuity with my life in the previous millenium. It also helps me to gain more appreciation for the progress I've made.

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And in general, I can relate to some of the things in skel's post. I'm in my late 30's. I always was and still am late in adopting new technologies and other changes.

Due to money being tight, I've actually managed to completely miss some of the most recent changes.

People talking about blogging and facebook accounts just frazzles me as well.

I just barely got on board with a Nintendo DS not long ago and since i only really know people online, I haven't been able to do the whole "Wi-Fi Connectivity" that many DS games offer.

 

I do somewhat understand the feelings of being out of place (or "out of time") in our fast-changing world.

More than the rest, this really sums up the problem.

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Oh, I didn't mention video games. I remember when there were arcades that only had pin ball machines.

 

My parents had "Pong" on a little 13" black-and-white TV in their bedroom, and my brother and I were only allowed to play this cutting edge of technology under supervision.

 

I remember when the stand-up Space Invaders first appeared, and I was completely dazzled when I saw a table-top Pac-man game in a Pizza Hut.

 

Santa finally brought us an Atari 2600 with "Combat" one year for Christmas, and we slowly aquired other games for it.

 

When Nintedo first game out, I hated it because it didn't have a joy stick and you had to move these tiny little buttons around. And it had more buttoms so it was too complicated. Despite the masocistic fact that the corner of the Atari joystick dug into the palm of my left hand and left a red sore mark when I played it for too many hours, I snubbed my nose at Nintendo. When Atari came out with the 5200 in their vain attempt to compete with Nintendo, I begged until Santa brought that too. I thought it was so advanced that it could still play all the old games, plus they had new games for it.

 

Years later Super Nintendo had Star Wars games that looked cooler then the Atari games, so I finally crossed-over to the Nintendo-side. I gave away my Atari 5200 and all my games to 3 very unfortunate children who weren't going to have any game system of any era and they played it like it was the newest, greatest thing. I still feel very good about that charity.

 

Return of the Jedi was the best Super NES game, and with the right codes, you could go strait to a certain level of the game. I remember flying the Falcon out of the Death Star without crashing into the tunnel or letting the explosion catch up with you was particularly fun. But eventually that and Donkey Kong Country got old and I went through a poor period, so I sold my Super NES and games for cash.

 

Several years later when Nintendo 64 came out and had a Star Wars Pod Racing game (99?), I bought it on credit card, played it for a couple months, and returned it to the store for a full refund.

 

I just can't get into modern console or computer games because they are just too complicated to me. Just give me very few control options, a simple little ship to fly around and shoot things, or the pitfall guy to jump and swing over stuff, you know?

 

In 2005 I saw a nostalgic Atari game system (in the shape of an old school 2600 joystick) that had 8 Revenge of the Sith games built into it (no console needed - the whole game system is reduced to inside the joystick). I bought that for old times sakes, but the simplisitc games were still a bit too complex for my tastes and difficult, but part of that might be because I don't have the dexterity I had when I was 13. So it's collecting dust, but I keep it anyway.

 

I still very occasionally like the play arcade games, but mostly the old ones or driving games. Over the past few years there were a few times I went to Dave & Busters and after spending rediculous amounts of credits for a miniscule amounts of playing time on video games, I always end up just playing ski ball.

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Dude, if you don't like it, Change it, its your life, nobody else is going to live it for you,

 

You haven't got it that bad,

But think of the people worse off, without all the things you take for granted

 

You are totally right. There are things he can do to improve his life and make himself happier. He just needs to do the things he needs to do.

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Just found this thread...

 

I'm 35 and I've felt like this before, and every time I do I remeber this. 100 years ago my wife and child would have died in childbirth. 50 years ago, maybe even when I was born, my child would have died at birth. For every crappy new thing that comes down the pike there is something that makes me safer and more comfy. The future is just fine with me.

 

Shawn.

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Just found this thread...

 

I'm 35 and I've felt like this before, and every time I do I remeber this. 100 years ago my wife and child would have died in childbirth. 50 years ago, maybe even when I was born, my child would have died at birth. For every crappy new thing that comes down the pike there is something that makes me safer and more comfy. The future is just fine with me.

 

Shawn.

 

I am good with the future as far as things we developed (such as ways to keep people alive when, like you said 100 years ago people would have died from) but I think this world has also gone downhill.

 

People arent are friendly, people are killing eachother and I think the world is way too dependent on technology and if something were to happen to the technology we would be screwed, expecially the younger set who werent around before technology exploded.

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I'm 42 and always thought myself to be on the forefront of technology. Maybe I am getting too old now but many new technologies don't interest me anymore.

 

  • I can't use a gamepad - it hurts my thumbs, I want a joystick or a mouse.
  • I don't use ICQ and others of that kind (I don't even know how this mode of communication is called). I don't want to get bothered when working on my PC by people calling in.
  • I hate mobiles, though I have been one of the first among my people to possess one, many years back, just after the stone age. But I use them only if I have to. They sound terribly and I am a sound man. I think they are meant for quick everywhere communication not to supplement real communication. And I don't like being accessible by anyone at anytime. I love my privacy. And I don't want to argue with some of my friends who are really mobile addicts about their habits of calling me about meaningless chit-chat. This has lead to a lot of quarrel.
  • I hate PDFs, they are clunky and just a pain to read (though I hope for this neat Plastilogic reader).
  • I think it is plain stupidity giving away personal information on social networking sites.
  • I want to play RPG with real people and computer games against the computer. I don't mix this up in MMORPGs (even this abbreviation is a monster).
  • And I still use vinyl and Video though I love my CDs and DVDs too, but I have too much of the stoneage tech to throw it away (Ok, the mobile mp3 players are really a good invention. I even listen to music again while walking just as in the 80s and they are smaller and can store more music than the cassette playing walkman could. There really are improvements).

 

But maybe, I am just too old for all this new stuff. Sometimes I feel like my father with his computer. But he learned how to use macros. So, there is still hope for me too.

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I just read elsewhere that someone "webcasted" his suicide to all of his friends online.

Some egged him on while others tried talking him down and still others thought it was a "kewl interactive television show".

 

This is "technology as nightmare" at its finest.

This is the future we champion?

I think I'll take a detour and go back to 1977, instead.

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I am good with the future as far as things we developed (such as ways to keep people alive when, like you said 100 years ago people would have died from) but I think this world has also gone downhill.

 

People aren't are friendly, people are killing each other and I think the world is way too dependent on technology and if something were to happen to the technology we would be screwed, especially the younger set who weren't around before technology exploded.

 

In other words, we are today what we were 100 years ago, just with better medicine and technology.

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My only objection to the forward careening of technology is the lack of money to partake in it

That is also an issue.

There is a frightening trend in a "underclass" and "overclass" forming, predominantly in the way that once you reach about $120K a year you have a multitude of methods to increase the wealth suddenly opening up that seemingly were denied before.

And even worse, there is a growing class of people who work like animals only to fall more slowly into debt at the "$30K and less" subset -- specifically when one works at Walmart.

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I have to admit, I am someone who works in the computer/IT field and while I enjoy technology I think the world has gotten dangerously overdependent on technology.

 

Things we used to be able to do without computers now we cannot do without them.

 

And it appears that many of the computers are being used to commit fraud on other people (Spam, shifting around money in computers, etc).

 

It's sad.

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Maybe it is just beacuse I live in a rural area but I don't see people as too reliant on tech. Here in central PA if the power goes out, we adapt, it it goes out for a long time people seem to help each other.

 

It's hunting season here...... the couple up the road are out of work and having a rough time. Today they got a deer, butchered and ready for cooking. I don't know which neighbor left it for them, it is just the way things go around here.

 

For all the problems of living in the "sticks"....... I'll never live anywhere else.

 

Shawn

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The secret to technology isn't using the latest and greatest devices just because they exist, but rather separating the chaff from the wheat. In other words, keeping a firm realization in mind that tools are only as useful as the skill of their wielders.

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Yep, kind of sad isnt it?

 

not really. Murder, kidnapping, rape, war, etc... have happened all through human history. We hear about it more as we have a few news organizations who have to fill their air time with violence and controversy...

 

We have the technology to feed, clothe and house far more people today than we did even 50 years ago. Just politics gets in the way.

 

Diseases are gone that used to kill thousands or more a year. Granted, other "diseases" are still around and highly deadly (e.g. cancers), but those are being solved thanks to technology. Flu vaccination, MMR, etc... prenatal care is far better today than it has been. Cancers have been slowly broken down and discovered that it isn't just one disease, which is why they are so complicated and deadly.

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Just an FYI: This thread was moved to Off-topic because it really has been off topic from the begining.

You are free to continue to add to the thread, I just needed to move it out of WEG discussions because it did not belong there.

Thank You

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