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pwcroft

Questions about OpenD6, OGL, and publishing.

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If I wanted to publish (electronic or print) a setting based on D6 Space, what sort of steps would I have to take to be legit? I've incorporated the OpenD6 logo. Would I need to incorporate some legal jargon, such as the OGL text at the end of D6 Adventure?

 

Am I allowed to copy and paste whole chunks of text from D6 Space into my game book? If I wanted to try to sell the book in print, via a print on demand sort of thing, is there anything more I should know about licensing and such?

 

Thanks!

 

Best,

 

Phil

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It is my understanding that all text in the books is released under the OGL. So you could use the text you need from D6 Space and you will need to include the OGL from D6 Adventure to make it legal whether it is released in PDF or Print form. All art though is still the sole property of WEG, so you would need to buy/make your own art for your product. You can decide to release a super cool new space setting using D6 as the core mechanics you can add in the rules you need to help flesh it out and make it yours. So what you are suggesting is totally within the concept and reasoning of the OGL's purpose. Just remember to declare what is Product Identity and what is Open in the OGL and you are good. For example you could decide to declare everything open and be done with it or you could declare the rules portions detailing character creation/advancement open, and mechanics of running the game (the stuff you are using from D6 Space as Open) and then all the setting information and NPCs introduced are all product identity not released to the general public. You could also let some stuff be open and other closed if you want to let people develop items for your setting frreely while maintaining control over certain aspects.

 

I wish you luck with you project mate.

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The reason it references Wizards of the Coast is because WOTC was the creator of the OGL that is being used. That's basically the only reason it is mentioned. I guess there's also a more convoluted use in that anything else using the WOTC OGL would also be usable under the OGL license for OpenD6.

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Thanks, Grimace.

 

Is it "OpenD6" or "Open D6"? Space or no space? Also, so I wouldn't refer to the D6 System, but instead to the OpenD6 system in my game?

 

Should I bother trademarking the game name?

 

Obviously this probably isn't critical. But I'm curious, nonetheless.

Edited by pwcroft

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From the read of the OGL text:

 

Open Game Content: All game mechanics and material not covered under Product Identity (PI) above; OpenD6 trademark and OpenD6 logo (as displayed on this

document cover page).

 

So I would say OpenD6 -- no space. And you are correct, you wouldn't refer to the D6 System, as that is still protected by trademark. So you would have to say it's the OpenD6 system.

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I would include my own Game Title in the OGL, at the end with all the other copyrights, correct? Could it look something like this?:

 

Game Title, Copyright 2011, P. W. Croft.

 

And would I even need to include any verbage about D6 and WEG in my version of the OGL, given that they aren't reference at all throughout the book?

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And would I even need to include any verbage about D6 and WEG in my version of the OGL, given that they aren't reference at all throughout the book?

 

I believe you would need to reference WEG and whatever else is already referenced in the OGL you use. I can't find my copy of the latest version of the OGL, but I think it's still in there.

 

The reasoning goes that OpenD6 itself references WEG and D6. To comply with the OGL which allows you to use the term OpenD6, you must include the full text of the OGL which allows that. You are allowed to add to it, as described in the license (designating your intellectual property and allowing you to post notices of your trademarks, etc.) But I don't think you can take things out. (Except if you purge all materials from your document which might be covered - which might get murky with D6 / OpenD6 if both are referred to in the OGL granted by WEG. WEG has granted use of the term OpenD6 - and not D6, but it still has to be in the OGL.)

 

Everything I said supposes that the OGL allowing use of the term OpenD6 includes Purgatory Press's trademarks D6, West End Games, etc.

Edited by Rosencrantz

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Would it be possible for someone to put together a "how to" guide on "How to publish a gamebook under the OpenD6 OGL"? Strip out all the legal mumbo-jumbo and pretend that the Average Joe on the street wants to publish a RPG using the OpenD6 license. What does Joe Average need to do and what restrictions does he need to understand?

 

Just a one-pager that tells Average Joe to:

1. Put the OpenD6 logo on the front

2. Put the license legalese page at the end

3. Put the stuff you want to publish in the middle.

 

And then just a few tips and tricks:

1. Don't copy artwork.

2. Be aware of XYZ restrictions to stay out of legal trouble.

3. Have fun and we look forward to seeing your work published.

 

Something like this: http://www.peginc.com/Licensing.html

Edited by Rerun941

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Would it be possible for someone to put together a "how to" guide on "How to publish a gamebook under the OpenD6 OGL"? ...

 

Something like this: http://www.peginc.com/Licensing.html

 

Agreed! That would be super useful.

 

If no one jumps up and volunteers, I might tackle the task myself. I would need a great deal of guidance from the folks who are more familiar with OpenD6's past and current state, though. I have been reading these forums for the past few days, and I confess that I am still a litle confused about what is permitted under OpenD6's OGL, and what isn't (for example, use of the OpenD6 logo).

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All materials of the OpenD6 OGC (including the logo) can be freely used as long as you abide by the OGL requirements.

 

OGL requirements are (rough overview):

1) Must have full intact OGL in product. Nothing but Section 15 and the Product Identity can be changed from the OGL text except for formatting (adding bold/italics, large/small font, etc).

2) In Section 15 you must declare what sources you referenced other OGL material from, if any (i.e. D6 Space, D6 Adventure). Section 6 declares how to format Section 15, you must repeat any Section 15 declarations from OGC sources you use (that are not already listed in your own Section 15, i.e. no need to refernce the same item twice). Your product is added to the list also.

3) PI declaration has no strict rules on how to word or format, just that you must do it, even if it is to say that all materials are OGC. You still have to show what you used of OGC (if any) if you did not add any.

4) Must declare what in the product is OGC (if anything is). No requirement that you add any OGC. Some books have OGC materials in special formats, colors, boxes, etc. for easy identification If possible, it is best to show sourced OGC in a similar fashion so people will know it is OGC.

 

D6 System, the trademarks/logos and WEG/PP trades, logos, and names are NOT OGC/OGL and therefore can only be referenced under fair use. Therefore, it is best not to mention them (except in a dedication, designers notes or closing and thanking Eric for letting us have OpenD6 :D ). Unless Eric gives special permission, we can not say our products use the D6 System or are derived from it, especially in advertising (as per the OGL Section 7).

 

 

EXAMPLE 1:

 

15. COPYRIGHT NOTICE

Open Game License v 1.0 Copyright 2000, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.

D6 Adventure (WEG 51011), Copyright 2004, Purgatory Publishing Inc.

D6 Space (WEG 51013), Copyright 2004, Purgatory Publishing Inc.

A Not Real Product, Copyright 2010, Another Not A Real Company Inc.

Metatronicverse RPG, Copyright 2010, Not A Real Company Inc.

 

PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION:

Product Identity: Bob Joel Smith, Master of the Metatronicverse, Metatronicverse, and any derivative trademarks; and all cover and interior art and trade dress are designated as Product Identity (PI) and are properties of Not A Real Company Inc.

Open Game Content: All game mechanics and materials not covered under Product Identity (PI) above.

 

EXAMPLE 2:

 

15. COPYRIGHT NOTICE

Open Game License v 1.0 Copyright 2000, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.

D6 Adventure (WEG 51011), Copyright 2004, Purgatory Publishing Inc.

D6 Space (WEG 51013), Copyright 2004, Purgatory Publishing Inc.

A Not Real Product, Copyright 2010, Another Not A Real Company Inc.

Metatronicverse RPG, Copyright 2010, Not A Real Company Inc.

 

PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION:

Product Identity: Bob Joel Smith, Master of the Metatronicverse, Metatronicverse, and any derivative trademarks; and all cover and interior art and trade dress are designated as Product Identity (PI) and are properties of Not A Real Company Inc.

Open Game Content: All material that was already OGC and any material in the blue shaded boxes.

 

 

Gah, I am sure I left something out (or it needs editing/grammar checking), but I now need sleep more. :D

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Though it is not specifically stated, text references to OpenD6 as the D6 System if fine in my book. It is primarily the old D6 logos that should not be used, using the OpenD6 logo instead. Of course, it would be silly of me to never allow or expect anyone to ever reference OpenD6 material as D6 System.

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Good to hear Eric, the creators of the OGL were not that generous with the use of their main product's name (at least not until the "4E" license). :D

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Though it is not specifically stated, text references to OpenD6 as the D6 System if fine in my book. It is primarily the old D6 logos that should not be used, using the OpenD6 logo instead. Of course, it would be silly of me to never allow or expect anyone to ever reference OpenD6 material as D6 System.

 

I understand that as far as logo's go, the official Open D6 logo should be used, while the old D6 system logos are still trademarked and not OGL.

 

I had thought it was your intention to allow text referencing of "the D6 System" but had been told that it was definitely not open because it was not specifically opened in the language of the new OGL text. Thank you again for everything including the further clarification, Eric.

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To be clear, per the "letter of the law" the text "D6 System" is trademarked and not open under the OGL, but I'll allow its use in refence to OpenD6 in order to promote brand coherency and because to do otherwise is silly and pointless. It is like disallowing people from use "D20" or "d20" in a system's text, especially when a publisher might simply call it "System 3.5" or "OGL 3.5" or whatever. Doing so doesn't really protect the sysem in any way, especially since virtually every gamer knows what "System 3.5," "Fantasy 3.5," etc., really means. It's pointless obfuscation. Disallow the use of the D20 logo, fine. Disallow the use of D20 on the cover or other prominent places, ok. But to disallow it and force them to use a ubiquitous but unprotected name in the products text is just stupid.

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