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Tysonium

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About Tysonium

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  • Birthday 09/17/1971

Converted

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    Overland Park, KS
  1. I'm familiar with the SW conversion, and I've been pretty impressed by it. I didn't agree with some of his realm changes, but then, that's what the multiverse is for. While I do plan on making some minor changes to the invading cosms, I'm keeping them mainly as written. Most of my changes are cosmetic updates to reflect changes in the world over the intervening years, especially in the area of technology (who knew my XBox would be more powerful than most of the top-of-the-line Marketplace models?). Once I get my thoughts in order, I'll start up my TORG D6 thread and post the link.
  2. The biggest thing I've learned in a couple of decades of gaming is not to get caught up in trying to do down-to-the-last-decimal conversions of anything. I fully expect to have to do things like spells and equipment from the ground up when it's important, and to use "close enough" numbers otherwise. The value charts will prove invaluable for this. The things I wrestle with are the basics like body points vs. wounds (I may use an amalgam of both), and the TORGocentric things like reality mechanics that have no immediate D6 counterparts. (Since I've come to the conclusion that I'm using D6, should I move further musings to a thread in the D6 forums, or continue discussion here?)
  3. I am leaning toward D6 for this one - although I love Savage Worlds, I do agree D6 will suit my purposes better. I am planning on making a couple of tweaks, though. I don't really want to handle contradictions in the form of modified difficulties, as disconnection always seemed fairly binary to me. It never seemed a matter of skill or luck as much as reality suddenly noticing and saying "cut it out". I also don't particularly like adding additional die rolls to the mix, which is why I've been pondering the following: Since I'm definitely using the TORG drama deck (actually a modified version based on the Shatterzone D6 deck). I was thinking of adding a "Reality Check" line to each card, to use in conjunction with the Wild Die. If a "1" comes up on the Wild Die and the Storm Knight is currently creating a contradiction, the Reality Check would determine if he disconnects. If the check is being made out of rounds, I could just flip the next card on the deck to determine if the character disconnects or not. I'm strongly considering not bothering with distinguishing between 1- and 4- case contradictions and just checking for whether or not the character is creating any sort of contradiction, just to keep things simple. Any thoughts on the matter?
  4. I'm not quite as concerned with the effects of disconnection -- being forced to operate by the rules of the reality you're in without being able to make contradictions is more effective than any penalties would be. My question was more of how to handle the mechanics of disconnection itself. I guess for either system a critical failure using an unsupported tool could be considered to cause a disconnection. My worry is that it would happen too often... but I'm not sure if that's a bad thing or not. One of the complaints that I've had in games I've run before was on the difficulty (or lack thereof) of reconnection, making a disconnect more a "lose a turn" mechanic than a roleplaying challenge (granted, a fault with the players, but one that tended to be supported by the mechanics). Perhaps an increase in frequency, combined with a more lengthy reconnect time (say, not until the end of the scene) would work.
  5. I'm going to have several months of downtime coming up, and am considering taking the time to prep a new TORG campaign. Unfortunately, I know my players well enough to know that they will not embrace the system, but I've always felt the background and setting to be robust enough to do with any system. I'm considering running TORG using either the Savage Worlds or d6 systems. My question is to those familiar with both: which one do you think would best emulate the cinematic tone of the setting, and what major tweaks do you think are needed to make it workable? My biggest concern is how to handle disconnections/reconnections, as the rest can probably be emulated with their respective special effects mechanics.
  6. I always considered things like flint arrowheads and obsidian knives/blades to be usable by the edeinos. Since they are "natural" and usable without higher tech concepts like metalworking, I treated them as part of the land itself and therefore a gift of Lanala. All that's needed is a "Shape Stone" miracle, and you're good to go.
  7. An alter ego could be a disadvantage if overall the transformation hinders the character (typically if he has no control over it). Jeckyl/Hyde or a classic "Wolfman" werewolf would be good examples. While the character is transformed, he has no control over his actions, and must deal with the events that occurred while he was transformed. If the player has full control of the transformed character, then the alter ego is most likely not a disadvantage. The ability to transform would definitely be considered a special ability, and any attribute/skill/personality changes between forms would be a special effect of the transformation and not an inherent advantage on top of the cost of the special ability. I would likely require both forms to purchase the transformation ability unless there was a reason that the alternate form would not be able to control the transformation. If you could voluntarily change into a bear, but be unable to change back until sunset, then the bear form doesn't need to pay for the special ability (since it has no control over it).
  8. It really depends on the nature of the transformation. If the change is cosmetic only you could just have it be a special effect. Assuming the character physically alters his form and has different abilities than the original form, you're better off having two separate character sheets. In the first instance, the characters are likely built on the same framework, with the only major difference being age and possibly physical attributes, depending on the age disparity. For your second example I would base the two characters off of different dice allotments, to represent the sheer difference in power between the dragon form and the humanoid. Physical skills would almost definitely change between forms, but mental scores would likely stay the same unless there is a change in intelligence or personality between forms.
  9. Here are a few examples of how the Trait system works in my campaign: Trait Example #1: Kendric the Elven Scout has the "Stutterer" trait (which he just made up). He weaves it into his background as part of the reason he chose a career that keeps him away from people for long periods of time. During the session, he finds out some information that the other characters need to get from him in a hurry. If the player doesn't want to deal with it, he can just pass it along as normal. Instead, he decides to play out the "Cathcart Towers" interrogation scene from "A Fish Called Wanda". This makes me laugh hard enough that Dr. Pepper sprays everywhere, so I throw him a character point and make him go get me a towel. Later that session, he decides to try to seduce a merchant's secretary to gain access to the inner offices. He voluntarily takes a -1D penalty on all interaction rolls with her to represent his inability to speak clearly and general nervousness. Another character point comes flying his way. Trait Example #2: Lynna is an investigative reporter desperate for a story. On her first assignment she was trapped in a walk-in freezer by a snarling guardian hellhound. While she was eventually rescued, she now has "Claustrophobia" written in big bold letters on her character sheet. While pursuing a reluctant lead down an alley, he climbs down an open manhole into the sewers. Though it means losing her story, she decides she just can't do it. She gets a character point for playing out a logical but inconvenient response to her fear, and now has to find an alternate means of tracking down the information she needed. Later that night, she finds herself in an elevator with media sensation Krulla Navarre. She'd love to get a couple of good quotes regarding his most recent scandal, but it's hard to concentrate on a penetrating interview when the walls are closing in. Taking a deep breath (and a -1D penalty for the scene), she begins...
  10. In my Dragonstar D6 thread i mentioned that I was not planning on using the Advantages and Disadvantages from D6. There is tendency among players to choose the "most useful" Advantages and then try to justify them as being crucial to their characters, and to pick non-hindering "roleplaying" Disadvantages that either disrupt the campaign or effectively grant free skill dice. Talents are an attempt to define the character's most notable features, be it special training or natural ability. It is essentially one free Rank of Skill Bonus that all player characters receive. It's my version of the tag skill from Torg. Talents cannot be purchased in play, though I may set aside a character point cost to increase the +1 bonus to a +2 for each individual skill the Talent applies to. Talents: Player characters are a cut above the average citizen. Choose one area your character excels in or received special training in, and select three skills related to that area. When using your Talent, you gain a +1 bonus to all skill checks where that Talent would apply. Examples: Athletic: You gain a +1 bonus to climbing, jumping, and running checks. Charismatic: You gain a +1 bonus to command, con, and persuasion checks. S.W.A.T. Training: You gain a +1 bonus to demolitions, firearms, and tactics checks. Well-connected: You gain a +1 bonus to bureaucracy, business, and streetwise checks. Traits are a replacement for Disadvantages, mostly psychological or social in nature, though I would certainly allow a "bad leg" or "nearsighted" Trait. Rather than granting skill dice during character creation, a Trait awards character points for roleplaying the Trait. This must be in a fashion that legitimately hinders the character in some way in order to earn the point. The player can either handicap his character through his actions, or deliberately take a -1D penalty to all affected actions for the duration of the scene. Traits: As much as they’d like to deny it, everyone has a couple of quirks that can cause trouble from time to time. Choose three traits that personify your character. Exceptional roleplaying of these traits can earn your character additional character points. If the scene involves skill checks, you may take a -1D penalty on your rolls to help simulate your trait. Sample traits are: Arrogant: Your character’s pride or overconfidence typically gets him in over his head. Coward: You have difficulty being brave, and tend to run and hide at the first sign of trouble. Forgetful:/B] You tend to forget small details, either through poor memory or lack of focus. Nearsighted: You have difficulty making out details that are far away from you, and have a tendency to lose your glasses/contacts. Phobic: You have a powerfully irrational fear of something others are not bothered by. Shy: You have difficulty speaking up or relating to others in person. My species packages list several common Talents and/or Traits that species stereotypically possesses. I plan on having an extended list of options, and encourage players to create their own. Feel free to add to either list, or offer any comments/criticism.
  11. Honestly those stats could just as easily be used for half-dragons in any setting. Even if I decide to stick with the half-dragon origin, I'll likely use a variation of such (drakes could just as easily be a slang term for them, after all). The important thing overall is consistency - the problem I've had in D&D with hybrids is mechanical for the most part, and my biology rant is based in part on that knee-jerk reaction to having to deal with the various half- templates. If I keep the origin, half-dragon/drakes will still all have one set of stats rather than be a dwarf/elf/etc. with some extra draconic features. By fiat if nothing else, the humanoid dragon form will be the default, rather than draconic-looking gnomes and minotaurs. If other unions do occur, they just won't bear fruit (at least not any that can be statted as a pc.)
  12. That was in fact a sample list just to give an idea of how the Talent system works. It's essentially one free rank of Skill Bonus every character receives for a well-thought out character and to compensate for the fact that I'm not using standard Advantages and Disadvantages to help define their character. I'm planning on writing up some more, but I fully expect players to create their own Talents that fit with their character's background or training (with GM approval, of course). I'm going to write up more Traits as well, and intend to include 3-4 "stereotype" Traits with each species package to show the roleplaying "tone" of the species. We'll still have gruff dwarves, nature-loving elves, curious gnomes, and food-obsessed halflings - and now they have the chance to earn character points for playing these Traits (so long as they actually hinder the character in some way). Remember, to earn the CP they have to handicap themselves for the scene, either through roleplaying or voluntarily taking a -1D penalty to all actions that would reasonably be affected for the duration of the scene.
  13. Half-Dragons will most definitely be a part of the conversion. As I said, I just never cared for the idea that a species as powerful and arrogant as dragonkind would regularly mate with (in the standard D&D universe) just about everything except for undead and oozes. Again, a rare exception is an interesting story - literally hundreds of thousands of half-dragons as written running around strains my suspension of disbelief (and that's saying a lot). In Dragonstar D6, a percentage of dragon eggs will hatch 2-3 drakes rather than a dragon wyrmling. These drakes are basically humanoid dragons, both doted on and pitied by their draconic parents. They form a useful bridge between the dragon elite and a universe that is primarily not built to their scale, allowing them to relate better to the "little people" that are their subjects. While their lifespan may be long compared to a human, they lack their dragon parent's lifespan measured in millenia, and are likely to be spoiled rotten by their parent out of guilt and pity. Ironically, the drakes of Asamet are more likely to be self-sufficient and receive useful training, as they are seen as valuable assets to be used rather than babied and spoiled. I'm not quite certain what I will do to balance a pc drake, as their breath weapon and social advantages are powerful assets. They are one of the few species I would consider a skill die cost to play. The package below is completely off the top of my head, as I do not have my books handy - feel free to toss up an alternate version for discussion. Drake Package Cost: 3 Skill Dice Dexterity: 2D/4D Fitness: 3D/5D Knowledge: 2D+2/4D+2 Mechanical: 1D+1/3D+1 Perception: 2D+2/4D+2 Technical: 1D+1/3D+1 Sorcery: 0D/ -- Move: 10 (5") Night Vision: Drakes can see clearly in low-light conditions, and suffer no penalties for lighting provided there is some light present. Breath Weapon: Like their draconic parents, drakes possess a powerful breath weapon. This takes the form of a 20m (10") line or 10m (5") cone of energy (fire, frost, acid, poison, steam, etc.), dependent on the drake's heritage, which does 6D damage to all within its area of effect. Continued use of the breath weapon is exhausting - if the breath weapon is used again without at least an hour between uses, the drake is Stunned (-1D to all actions) until able to rest for an hour. This penalty increases by -1D for each additional use until the drake rests. Nobility: In the dracocentric universe of Dragonstar, draconic heritage is enough to grant instant nobility. Wherever a drake goes, he is treated as a member of the aristocracy, with all of the privileges and responsibilities that entails. Common Traits: Spoiled: You are used to getting your own way, and having the finest things in life handed to you on a mithril platter. Ivory Tower: You have never had to make it in the world of the "little people" until now, and have trouble relating to commoners. Noblesse Oblige: You feel obligated to help those who you perceive to be unable to properly help themselves, regardless of their desire for your assistance. Black Sheep: You have done something to alienate you from your peers. While still a member of the aristocracy, you are rarely afforded any respect from them, and receive no assistance from your House or family. I'm sure this package still needs work, but it's a start. It's a 13D template, so I'm not positive I've charged enough for it. I consider the breath weapon to balance out to a net zero cost, as it is probably a one use attack that rapidly debilitates if abused (I'd probably apply the -1D to the damage as well). It can't be focused or tuned, so it will rarely be useful outside of combat (no aciding your way through a locked door without it spraying everywhere). The nobility idea may need some work, but with their background drakes are by birth members of the aristocracy, so I felt that should be an inherent part of the package. Thoughts?
  14. This is what I've been working on so far: Chapter 1: Character Creation Dragonstar D6 uses two primary methods of character creation: templates or defined limits. Those familiar with the D6 Space creation point system may use it with GM approval, but it will not be detailed here. If you choose to use a template, select one of the character templates provided and assign seven skill dice to the skills listed; attributes, character options, and equipment have already been done for you. Note that the listed skills are ones that your character might typically have, though you are welcome to choose others. If you wish to create your own template from scratch, assign the following: Species: Choose from one of the approved player species. While many others exist in the empire, these have been balanced for use as player characters. Attributes: Every species lists a minimum and a maximum die for each attribute. Distribute 18 dice among these attributes, making sure to stay within the species minimums/maximums. Note: the Sorcery attribute begins at 0D for most species, but has no maximum. Dexterity: Physical agility, hand-eye coordination, and reflexes Fitness: Physical power, health, and ability to resist damage Knowledge: Overall book-learning and intelligence Mechanical: Skill at operating mechanical equipment (vehicles, spacecraft, sensors) Perception: Awareness, intuition, and skill at social interaction Technical: Ability to manipulate, repair, and modify technology Sorcery: Ability to understand and manipulate magic Skills: Distribute seven dice among the skills. The maximum number of dice added to any one skill is 3D. Move: Per species. Most species have a move of 10 meters per round. If using miniatures, halve this number to get the number of inches moved (10 m/rd = 5”/rd). Strength Damage: Drop the pips from your character’s Fitness or strength score (including any modifiers that affect the die code), divide the die code by 2, and round up. This is the Strength Damage die code. Funds: Funds measures how much wealth your character can usually get without too much trouble. All characters start with a base Funds die code of 3D. Talents: Player characters are a cut above the average citizen. Choose one area your character excels in or received special training in, and select three skills related to that area. When using your Talent, you gain a +1 bonus to all skill checks where that Talent would apply. Examples: Athletic: You gain a +1 bonus to climbing, jumping, and running checks. Charismatic: You gain a +1 bonus to command, con, and persuasion checks. Well-connected: You gain a +1 bonus to bureaucracy, business, and streetwise checks. Traits: As much as they’d like to deny it, everyone has a couple of quirks that can cause trouble from time to time. Choose three traits that personify your character. Exceptional roleplaying of these traits can earn your character additional character points. If the scene involves skill checks, you may take a -1D penalty on your rolls to help simulate your trait. Sample traits are: Arrogant: Your character’s pride or overconfidence typically gets him in over his head. Phobic: You have a powerfully irrational fear of something others are not bothered by. Shy: You have difficulty speaking up or relating to others in person. Equipment: You should work with your GM to determine appropriate starting equipment. This typically includes 1-2 weapons, 2-3 useful items relating to your template or background, and 3-4 miscellaneous items of limited or specific use. Talents and Traits are my version of background Advantages and Disadvantages. I want to encourage roleplaying and discourage cherry-picking during character creation, so I decided to effectively give everyone one Rank of Skill Bonus for free to reflect that there's something their character is a bit better at than normal. Traits are essentially quirks and hindrances, but rather than give skill dice up front I'm choosing to award their appearance in-game with character points. Trait Example #1: Kendric the Elven Scout has the "Stutterer" trait (which he just made up). He weaves it into his background as part of the reason he chose a career that keeps him away from people for long periods of time. During the session, he finds out some information that the other characters need to get from him in a hurry. If the player doesn't want to deal with it, he can just pass it along as normal. Instead, he decides to play out the "Cathcart Towers" interrogation scene from "A Fish Called Wanda". This makes me laugh hard enough that Dr. Pepper sprays everywhere, so I throw him a character point and make him go get me a towel. Later that session, he decides to try to seduce a merchant's secretary to gain access to the inner offices. He voluntarily takes a -1D penalty on all interaction rolls with her to represent his inability to speak clearly and general nervousness. Another character point comes flying his way. Trait Example #2: Lynna is an investigative reporter desperate for a story. On her first assignment she was trapped in a walk-in freezer by a snarling guardian hellhound. While she was eventually rescued, she now has "Claustrophobia" written in big bold letters on her character sheet. While pursuing a reluctant lead down an alley, he climbs down an open manhole into the sewers. Though it means losing her story, she decides she just can't do it. She gets a character point for playing out a logical but inconvenient response to her fear, and now has to find an alternate means of tracking down the information she needed. Later that night, she finds herself in an elevator with media sensation Krulla Navarre. She'd love to get a couple of good quotes regarding his most recent scandal, but it's hard to concentrate on a penetrating interview when the walls are closing in. Taking a deep breath (and a -1D penalty for the scene), she begins...
  15. One of the biggest differences in the Mongoose version is the concept of Perversity Points. They are basically a pool of points that you can add to your own dice rolls to improve your chance of success, or give to somebody else to alter their chances. It's fun to see the bidding wars erupt when the team is divided on whether or not they want an action to succeed. Also, the Mongoose version has three different play styles to choose from: Straight, Classic, or "silly" (I can't remember what they called it). Classic is golden age Paranoia, the age of "Send in the Clones" and "HIL Sector Blues". Straight is much more serious and dystopian - think 1984 meets Brazil. It's still quirky and tongue-in-cheek, but more serious, and, oddly enough, makes for a great long-term campaign because not every mission turns into a firefight just because the lights in the room went out. The "silly" style is much more of the late WEG style of 5th edition, where the game is likely to be over before it begins because the entire party wipes themselves out (6 times!) before the mission briefing starts. I tend to favor Classic games with just enough Straight in them to allow for some level of continuity and characer development. I like that you can now actually run a decent campaign rather than a never-ending series of one-offs.
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