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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/17/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    No dumb question, only dumb answers !
  2. 1 point
    A few days late, but Happy New Year! I hope the best of last year is the worst of this year for everyone!
  3. 1 point
    Happy New Year to you all!
  4. 1 point
    Happy New year to you. I see the D&D crowd have been posting pictures on social media of two d20s side by side, which is cute but I'm hoping for more of a d6 kind of year.
  5. 1 point
    The concept of Advanced Skills is perfectly fine. It would just kind of depend on which skills you feel are (A). Advanced skills should be high level learning type skills. Rocket Science, so to speak. Something like (A) Surgery. I found putting a more limited increase on how quickly a character may raise in skills was easier to control the "bucket o' dice" issue for advanced characters. But making some skills, appropriate for your setting, is also a reasonable method to limit some skills even more.
  6. 1 point
    What I do is have a graduating scale. So the initial aspect of learning a skill might be easy, but once you hit a certain point, it becomes much more difficult to continue learning. Gaining a skill not previously known Must have used it successfully more than 3 time in order to gain a single pip. The first pip costs 3-5 CPs to get, depending on the complexity of the skill. Advancing from 1 pip up to 3D The cost is a variable amount of CPs to increase, and the maximum amount that may be gained at one time is 1D. The skill can be advanced by normally using the skill with the average amount of success and failure. Advancing from 3D+1 up to 4D The skill may be increased by 1 or 2 pips (usually one), and the cost varies depending on the number of pips. The skill can only be advanced for heavy usage of the skill or above average quality of use. Advancing from 4D+1 up to 5D The skill may be increased only 1 pip at a time. The cost if 4 CPs per pip. The skill may only be advanced for extremely high usage of the skill or extraordinary quality of use. Advancing from 5D+1 to 7D The skill may only be increase 1 pip at a time. The cost to increase a pip will vary depending on the skill level. The skill can only be advanced for extended usage. Usually the amount of usage necessary to learn something new is around 1 to 2 months. Advancing from 7D+1 or more The skill may only be increased 1 pip at a time. The cost to increase varies depending on the skill level. Advancement can only be achieved if the person is instructed by someone that has a higher skill level than the person being taught. Time to learn something new will depend on the instruction ability of the teacher and generally takes anywhere from 1 week to 1 month of proper training.
  7. 1 point
    In the book "Magic & Miracles", I touch upon 3 different magic systems. One is like the "Vancian" magic from D&D in that the magic user must memorize the spell, then retains it until they use it. They can only memorize a certain number of spells, and only cast spells equal to the amount of dice in the Magic special attribute. One is Faith, which I use for various religious or nature-based powers (like Druids or high-level Rangers). They "pray" for whatever gives them their power to grant them the ability to bring about a spell. They simply roll their Prayer dice vs. the difficulty of whatever they are praying for. So praying for fire to light a torch might be easy, but praying to heal someone who lost an arm might be much more difficult. And praying to resurrect a dead person might be significantly more challenging to do, and likely not achievable by low-skilled characters (barring a ridiculous die roll with the Wild Die). The third, which I didn't detail as fully as I have info for, is Conjuring, which taps into a different power of the planet. The user must "learn the trick" of casting the spell. It uses up just a bit of the stored energy within the Conjurer. They can build upon their "tricks" by learning to do so. So a Conjurer might learn to start a flame, such as lighting a torch. It may take 5 power to do that. But then they want the fire to burn even if not cast on a burnable material. So they practice and get that trick learned, which costs a bit more power. Then they want the fire to be thrown, as in an attack, and have a modest range, and do more damage than simply catching something on fire. So they learn that trick, which costs notably more power depending on how much damage they want to do, how far they want it to go, and whether the damage explodes on impact or just engulfs the target only. So it might take 25 power to do that trick. Then, as the Conjurer becomes more skilled, the cost to perform those "tricks" lessens and it doesn't use as much. So a higher skilled Conjurer might only take 3 power to make fire, and only 18 power to do a ranged attack. You can find the pdf of the book here: https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/92079/Magic--Miracles You may be able to mine it for ideas, or just use some of the material as is. Or you can alter the names of things to fit in your setting. If you have any questions about it, just ask!
  8. 1 point
    It is a good suggestion to just not use the Funds method in the book if it doesn't work for your setting. It was presented more for people who wanted to run things "fast and loose" and not worry about pinching pennies, so to speak. But since you are running things on a tighter budget, you may just want to go with coinage, as suggested. That way you can control how much the players end up with, roughly. And it puts more emphasis on the value of things, as everything will have value in either trade or worth.
  9. 1 point
    First off, Welcome! It's good to see someone else here. Sword and Sorcery tends to have people starting out broke at the beginning of each adventure. Funds dice represent the overall buying power of characters through bank accounts, investments, trade goods, etc... If you want to keep players from simply buying whatever, then I suggest doing away with the Funds dice completely. Switch over to coinage, and remind players that in the setting, they're adventuring to live the good life whenever they can. Between adventures, they sell, trade, and give away their loot so they can stay in a fancy place, drink the best wine, and sleep with the most beautiful professional women. After each drunken bender, they're broke again and need to head out and find some more riches, but give each one a fancy new piece of equipment that they've been wanting which they could have bought, stolen, or won. Also, if you want to avoid a lot of the record keeping with coins, have the items sold be gems, jewels, artwork, or something that has a value not really set like coins. I hope this helps a bit, it was the way that my old GM used to run his Conan games, and we had a lot of fun doing those.
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